A Tall Tale from History

There’s a lot of research into luck – it’s an interesting topic to look into, whether someone thinks they are lucky or not – turns out, things that happen to them have nothing to do with luck at all, simply ‘stuff happens’, but we call ourselves either lucky or unlucky based on our more positive or negative view on life.

Personally, I think I’m very lucky.  I am from not just one of the most beautiful counties of Ireland, but one of the most beautiful areas of the world (on a good day, although when its pishing down with rain it’s still not too bad).  The coastal route of County Antrim is one of the most scenic areas of the world, through the infamous nine Glens of Antrim where many a folk song and tale comes from, right up to the Giant’s Causeway, where giants, heroes, musical instruments, dogs and …camels (seriously) are built into the volcanic rocks.

The Giant’s Causeway is where geology, archaeology, folk lore, myth and the raging Atlantic all meet.

North Antrim Coastline

So it would be rude, as a budding storytelling teacher, to not tell the most infamous story of all, when The Giant’s Causeway’s inhabitants, Finn MacCool and his wife Oonagh, had a bit of a falling out with Scottish giant Benandonner. 

This story, by the way, also works really well with young learners.  If you are teaching comparatives and superlatives, it’s a very easy story to grade to their level and compare lots of what’s going on in the story – this idea was given to me by colleague Simona Stambazzi who has been teaching this story to younger ones for years when covering that grammar point.

Class, isn’t it?

Also, let’s be honest, it’s also a great excuse for me to show photos and videos of the Antrim coast, Causeway and talk about the tall tales and giants and fairies that live around the area!

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